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Future endeavours, talks, societies, ketosis and mood stabilising drugs.

Ok, so I haven’t updated for a while which isn’t ideal as I like to try and share what I’ve been up to lately. My shyness gets the better of me sometimes as well as that voice in my head that constantly says I’m never good enough and I don’t deserve anything good to happen so why am I still doing well when others have tried their very best and they are no longer around. I know that I like to push things and think outside the box with every little thing that I try to be happy and to continue to keep the cancer beast away while controlling the epilepsy, but despite feeling very content I feel there is still something missing. Other days I feel deliriously happy for no reason, its just cool being alive and you realise what a gift that is, just feels like a selfish thought at times but keeps me sane. I’ve lost a lot of friends to brain cancer recently and it makes me feel numb because the sad fact is that I am getting used to hearing sad news. Personally I have countless backup plans of novel approaches I have been researching that compliment metabolic approaches to managing this disease should the worst ever happen in future…ever the optimist eh? ūüėČ I am well aware of the effect of different emotional states on physiological systems so keeping my thoughts and feelings in check is something I definitely prioritise. It is of course partly why the placebo effect exists and why there is even a science dedicated to how our emotional state changes our biology. I don’t get stressed, eustress yes but not distress. How emotions are mapped in the body. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131231094353.htm “When under stress, cells of the immune system are unable to…

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Metabolic Therapeutics: the science behind exploiting weaknesses in cancer metabolism.

In the third episode of the Beating Brain Cancer podcast we had the great pleasure of interviewing Dr. Angela Poff,¬†Research Associate in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida. Dr. Angela Poff Dr. Poff¬†works in the Laboratory of Nutritional and Metabolic Medicine under the mentorship of Dr. Dominic D’Agostino. Her research focuses on¬†the development and testing of non-toxic metabolic therapies for cancer and neurological disorders. Dr. Poff’s research focuses primarily on¬†vivo research using rodent models with metastatic cancer derived from human glioblastoma cell lines. The aim of her work is¬†to observe the effects of nutritional ketosis, exogenous ketones and hyperbaric oxygen therapy and outline the underlying synergistic anti-cancer¬†mechanisms behind these treatments. The audio recording of this interview is available here:¬†http://www.braincanceroptions.com/metabolic-therapeutics

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Exercise updates, photodynamic therapy and the iKnife.

Exercise was a huge seizure trigger for me since acquiring brain tumour related epilepsy. Over time my seizure threshold has improved thanks to a high DHA ketogenic diet. Yesterday I was able to run for the first time in 4 years. I managed 20 minutes plus a light resistance workout. Today I ran 30 minutes without stopping at a decent pace.¬† I never thought this would be possible when I look back at where I’ve come, suffering those horrible grand mal seizures and now being on no medication with complete seizure control.¬† Never forget that our brains are made of fat and cholesterol. As I have written on several occasions, in and around malignant brain tumours we see dysregulated lipid¬†composition when compared to healthy, disease free brains. This is often how neurosurgeons actually identify tumour tissue for resection, as¬†described from the study below and from use of the iKnife, which identifies malignant tissue and can be combined with a form of photodynamic therapy.¬† Photodynamic therapy- 5-ALA:¬†http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/glow-in-the-dark-brains-aid-tumour-surgery The tissue that ‘glows’ represents diseased tissue and the differences in lipid composition are clear. The smoke coming from the iKnife during resection of the tumour can analyse the lipid composition of tissue using a mass spectrophotometer¬†http://publishing.rcseng.ac.uk/doi/full/10.1308/rcsbull.2016.88.¬† Epilepsy and neurodegerative diseases can all me managed more effectively with manipulation of dietary fatty acids. I believe this has been an essential part of my strategy to manage my disease and the epilepsy I have acquired as a result. I have been fine-tuning this approach over time and I have regular blood tests to monitor the efficacy of this approach. I wrote about this in more detail in my post on fatty acids and brain tumours which can be found here:¬†http://mybraincancerstory.blogspot.co.uk/2016/07/fatty-acids-and-brain-tumours.html¬† Source:¬†http://www.pnas.org/content/113/6/1486.short The iKnife:

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Mornings are fun.

Despite exercise being a seizure trigger I enjoy my morning walks. Its at a pace which doesn't overstimulate my brain and I find it very calming. Walking allows me to reflect and to enjoy natural beauty. We have so many beautiful green spaces in this country and its a beautiful, sunny day today. The shorts will be on later and I'll do some sunbathing to top up the vitamin D. :) Continue reading
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Aspirin for brain cancer. Evaluating efficacy

Some new videos on my Youtube channel evaluating the efficacy of different forms and doses of aspirin for brain cancer management and as a potential anticonvulsant: I'm trying to get used to recording presentations using my computer. I'm not sure how to edit videos yet without hassle but I tried my best here. I hope people find this interesting, there are 3 videos in the series.   Aspirin for brain cancer- part 1 Aspirin for brain cancer- part 2 Aspirin for brain cancer- part 3 Continue reading
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New insights from a new website?

I have created a website to provide a place to share data I have collected to support a metabolic protocol to managing brain cancer. I hope that this information can empower patients by providing the resources they need to take control of their treatment, whatever that may be. I have decided to name it: ‘Metabolic Therapy Resources for Brain Cancer Management’ This website will grow and evolve as I gather more information and when I have time to update it. Feel free to contribute with additional materials others might find useful in their search for evidence based metabolic approaches to this devastating disease. Please share with anybody you know who has been diagnosed with a brain tumour of any grade and type. http://www.braincanceroptions.com

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Fatty acids and brain tumours

After a recent study came out suggesting that brain tumours can adapt and use fatty acids for energy I thought I would attempt to clear up a few things concisely and succinctly. I’m writing a research proposal at the moment that I’m very excited about if my plans ever come to fruition from sufficient funds but firstly I wanted to tackle this confusion over the fatty acid study that came out recently entitled; ‘Fatty acid oxidation is required for the respiration and proliferationof malignant glioma cells.’ Firstly I would like to point out that the title is a misleading half truth which validates one very important point but does by no means conclude that all fats are created equal. I could point out several questionable aspects of the study design, however I cannot fault the actual investigation, more the application and the sweeping conclusions made that I find a little irresponsible and misleading. The conclusions by no way invalidate a ketogenic diet, but the findings definitely support a well structured ketogenic diet and validate the significant benefits that come with ensuring fatty acids are balanced appropriately. I found some of the conclusions equally baffling, including this one. Also strangely no real mention of glutamine even though one of the study aims was to identify the metabolic fuel requirements of human glioma cells.: They mention how the fatty acid binding drug etomoxir can be used therapeutically to inhibit fatty acid oxidation and reduce proliferation and viability of mouse glioma-initiating cells which is certainly an interesting finding and I applaud them for that, however I question the safety of this drug in terms of the detrimental effect is has on the liver over time and the possible depletion of DHA which I will explain has countless anti tumour benefits. The drug could potentially…

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Gliomas adapting to using fats for energy?

Brain tumours adapting to fats? The papers at the bottom of this page will go some way to allay any fears you may have. It underlines my approach of balancing out my fatty acids and testing through http://www.omegaquant.com/ every 3-6 months to examine my fatty acid profile via a blood sample. If you have brain cancer I believe this is the most important test you can have.  The ratio of omega 3 and 6 is of vital importance. This is more important than simply monitoring ketosis and it compliments ketogenesis nicely. Brains want lots of DHA, especially brain afflicted with any kind of neurogenerate be disease.  http://www.graduate-studies-in-cancer-research.org/Godbout/pdfs/Final%20with%20audio.pdf ‘The fatty acid composition of human gliomas differs from that found in non-malignant brain tissue.’ http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02587914 I actually touched on this in more depth in a January post. Brain cancer doesn’t like DHA. Please read the whole post and bullet points to fully understand this.:  http://mybraincancerstory.blogspot.co.uk/2016/01/dha-more-important-than-ketones-for.html?m=1 The study I am currently critically analysing and has gained so much attention is this one below. I feel many people have been mislead by the findings so I will attempt to clear this up.  I think it’s a great study as it validates my approach, but I don’t agree that all fats are created equal. This study analysed linoleic acid in vivo. The results were interesting to me, but not particularly surprising. I don’t agree with the title or conclusions because I don’t agree that all fats are created equal, the type and ratio are of critical importance. I completely agree that this is true under the conditions applied in the study. I really like the study, I just don’t value the irresponsible conclusions made by journalists. I have access to the full study but this is the abstract: Fatty acid oxidation is required for the respiration and…

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