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Testing 1.. 2.. 3.

Yesterday I had a myriad of blood tests which prove once again that I am not only a human Guinea pig, but a human pincushion as well. Let’s just say the nurse wasn’t particularly gentle with her approach to collecting blood samples for analysis. I have these tests done every 3-6 months to keep an eye on various health markers so that I can keep on top of everything and maybe make some adjustments if I need to. Just some of the tests I have include:  Full Blood Count (FBC) Bone Profile C-reactive protein Renal function test Tricglycerices 25 hydroxy vitamin D I find that the C-reactive protein test is very important because on of the characteristics of cancer progression is that it goes hand in hand with systemic inflammation. There is a relationship between favourable readings from this test (low readings) and better cancer survival rates that we can see in the literature.  Here is an explanation of the validity of the test as summarised in the literature.  Elevated C-reactive protein in the diagnosis, prognosis, and cause of cancer. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22035340 I should have the results in 4-5 days and then I will scrutinise them myself as I usually do rather than rely on the doctor’s typical non descriptive response of ‘oh yes, they’re fine’ or the familiar ‘no action needs to be taken’ response that means very little. Measures to simply avoid deficiency or serious complications are not always enough when you are aiming for optimal health which is why I have my own targets for these measurements.  Among these tests I had an ECG which I don’t have very often but I do believe it is important, particularly as I play around with my sodium, potassium, and magnesium ratios which can all effect heart rate and blood pressure differently…

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Week 1 of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy means the delivery of oxygen under pressure at different ‘depths’ or ‘atmospheres’. People use HBOT for a number of reasons to help with neurological conditions, cancer, diabetes, sports injuries, tinnitus, stubborn infections and ulcers. It can also speed up wound healing and recovery from radiotherapy damage. Under the right conditions, brain tumours don’t like oxygen. Typically for brain cancer patients an oncologist would only advise the treatment for radiation induced necrosis and you would most likely have to ask. Radiation necrosis can be a huge problem because it can cause a lot more mutations. I never had this problem thankfully but I would recommend HBOT to help treat any cancer. Regarding radiation necrosis: ‘In the clinical situation of a recurrent astrocytoma (postradiation therapy), radiation necrosis presents a diagnostic dilemma. Astrocytic tumours can mutate to the more malignant glioblastoma multiforme. Glioblastoma multiforme’s hallmark histology of pseudopalisading necrosis makes it difficult to differentiate radiation necrosis from recurrent astrocytoma using MRI.’ http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1157533-overview HBOT is also great for combatting extreme fatigue like ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. The Oxygen Therapy Service I am using is provided by Hertfordshire Multiple Sclerosis Therapy Centre. They can be found at http://www.hertsmstherapy.org.uk/ The chamber fits up to 7 people at a time. Cancer patients can get the treatment at a reduced fee by contacting Yes to Life at www.yestolife.org.uk As readers of this may be aware, I am aiming to get similar results to the encouraging animal studies using a restricted ketogenic diet and HBOT as a powerful synergistic treatment for cancer management. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0065522 I also draw inspiration from Ketopet. Dogs get even more brain tumours than humans so it is inspiring to see positive results from this treatment at the Ketopet Sanctuary. http://www.ketopetsanctuary.com/ Note: a lot of people take antioxidants during HBOT. DO NOT DO THIS!! Think about it, HBOT works,…

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Omega 3 experiment- the fishogenic diet

This was just a fun experiment because I get bored sometimes. I wanted to increase protein to see what happens. The end result is nothing much! These are typical readings for me but it’s interesting how eating more fish doesn’t change much compared to other sources of protein. I could eat half the amount in red meat and the effect on my blood glucose would be twice as much. That’s why I don’t eat much red meat and when I do it’s just lamb heart.  I would definitely recommend red meat on ketogenic diets, I just do this because of its easier to consistently stay in therapeutic ketosis for cancer management this way. Tomorrow I start hyperbaric oxygen therapy. I have my own diet protocol for that which is quite different but challenging to explain. It will be a whole lifestyle change starting tomorrow and not just diet related. Should be fun! I went for a long walk early this morning and then decided to eat a little bit differently to compare results with my normal diet (restricted protein, organ meats, fatty insects, no carbs). I quite enjoyed this as something simple and different to my usual routine. It does feel strange on my stomach having plant fibre again as opposed to animal fibre but I don’t mind too much. It’s tolerable.  For the experiment I increased meal frequency, protein intake with foods high in omega 3 fatty acids, and added some plant fibre-coconut flour, flaxseed, avocado. Today’s food experiment:  2 omega 3 enriched eggs, 50g ghee, 8g coconut flour- makes a coconut flour ‘bread’ 2 omega 3 enriched eggs, 50g ghee, 10g flaxseed- makes a flaxseed ‘bread’  1 avocado  (I can eat these now so I do occasionally. A great source of potassium to complement the magnesium supplementation) Macadamia…

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DHA- More important than ketones for brain cancer management?

What is DHA and why is it so important?DHA is Docosahexaenoic Acid. Its a bit of a mouthful so you can see why we just call it DHA! It is the preferred dietary n-3 Fatty Acid for the development of the brain and the retina. It is essential for brain maturation as we age and the literature shows that with neurological disease we see a significant decline in DHA in the brain compared with healthy brains.When we look closer at how DHA is so incredibly important in how our brains develop, it reminds me of the fact brain cancer is the biggest cancer killer of the under 40’s. I see a lot of children with brain tumours, particularly neuroblastoma. With this in mind I feel it would be irresponsible at best to not make dietary adjustments to optimise DHA intake while also monitoring vitamin D status in paediatric brain tumour patients, particularly as they’re brains are still developing. There is the possibility of, at the very least having neuroprotective benefits to combat neuroinflammation and perhaps the harsh treatments families may wish to pursue for their children. I have seen unequivocal evidence of the benefits using this kind of approach on children with neuroblastoma in the literature but it is not applied clinically. I believe this should be standard practice. The most interesting work I have seen with DHA has been observations of brain tissue in gliomas. Even though I was diagnosed with a high grade glioma, I assure you that I am not just being biased, I wanted to show that even in the worst case scenarios DHA has a profound impact on optimal neurological functioning. Is it as a cause or a consequence? I don’t know, all I can do is share the information and provoke discussion. Can we reverse…

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Tick, Tock, Curcumin O’Clock

‘Treatments based on the phytochemical curcumin have much potential for use in cancer treatments because of their effects on a wide variety of biological pathways, including those regulating the cell division cycle and circadian clocks. Cancer incidence and progression are influenced by circadian clock cells in multiple organs and tissue types.  ‘According to chronotherapeutic studies aimed at optimizing cancer treatments based on the circadian cycle it is known that circadian clocks modify the effectiveness of cancer treatments. Thus, it is important to determine whether curcumin and similar chemotherapeutic treatments being tested against cancer in clinical trials are influenced by the circadian clock. Similarly, it is important to determine whether curcumin alters the timing activity of circadian clock cells. To understand how curcumin treatments and combinatorial therapies using curcumin with standard therapies can be made more effective, we characterized the impact of the circadian clock on the timing of cell death and cell division in curcumin-treated C6 glioma cells.’ http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/75/15_Supplement/1772.abstract

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Cancer cells adapting to use ketone bodies for fuel?

A response to an interesting study: The bad news is:  Cancer is very good at adapting in order to proliferate in challenging environments so this study throws up interesting talking points.  The good news is:  1. It will always be effective for all types of epilepsy. – including brain tumour related epilepsy (and related symptoms) 2. There are many different approaches within metabolic therapy that are effective. Central Nervous System cancers are unique in many ways.  3. We are not rodents and other animals with more spontaneous tumours are continuing to display very encouraging long term results.  4. Human cancer cells injected into mice have had to adapt to foreign conditions anyway so I would presume this may also be a factor to consider.  5. The quality and type of ketogenic diet is vitally important and continues to be ignored in rodent studies (and the few human clinical trials out there). Quality of fats used is generally poor in these studies. Some even use vegetable fats!! The study is very interesting and needs to be researched further but we need to further expand our horizons to get truly relevant data.  Researchers often have a very narrow focus, these rodents typically aren’t even monitored for seizure activity which is a very important consideration.  I have been asked? Would be interesting to seperate the unique ketosis benefits from the normoglycemia? Certainly, but we must remember that they are interrelated they and that it remains a fact that if quality fats are included we see that in and around malignant brain tissue we continue to see very low amounts of DHA (which is also cytotoxic to brain cancer cells). Ensuring that quality fats, particularly DHA (which makes up at least 20% of healthy brain tissue, still appears to make perfect sense when we…

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Preparations for hyperbaric oxygen therapy!

Preparation for HBOT. No exogenous ketones required. Ketones need to be high and blood glucose low during treatment. 90% fat, 10% protein to have the most benefit in order to obliterate any microscopic cancer cells that might be left. I don’t always maintain this kind of reading but I have learned to time it for when I need to. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for cancer management requires this kind of restriction, I definitely won’t want to maintain this after for long even though I feel good at the moment. Professor Thomas Seyfried has informed me that:  ‘It will be very important that your GKI is 1.0 or below when you receive HBOT (our GKI paper is attached).  Our preclinical data on GBM show that oxygen therapy can increase tumor growth except when ketones are high and glucose is low.  Use HBOT only at the time of day when your blood ketone levels are highest and you glucose is lowest.  You will need to determine time this for yourself. I think this will be the most important consideration.’  Here is the paper…  http://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12986-015-0009-2 Interestingly he also gave insight into some of my burning questions regarding exogenous ketones, DHA, and curcumin. He has stated… ‘Your liver will produce D-b-hydroxybutyrate from the fats in the KD.  If you take exogenous ketones, it is best if they also contain D-b-hydroxybutyrate.  Some exogenous ketone preparations contain both the D- and the L- forms of b-hydroxybutyrate.  According to Richard Veech, The L- form will not be as therapeutic as the D- form.  However, exogenous ketones can help lower blood glucose that is important.  I have not yet evaluated the effects of exogenous ketones in or preclinical model of GBM.  The therapeutic effect of treatments can sometimes be different in the brain environment than outside the brain. I…

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HBOT and keto

I will be having hyperbaric oxygen therapy on January 4th to compliment my ketogenic diet. There are also plans to open up a ketogenic cafe at the centre. The owner is very interested in my story and approach. I’m aiming to set up a fundraising page to ensure that more brain cancer patients have access to this while on ketogenic diets.  I will give daily updates of my progress and details of the protocol once I start. These are very exciting times. 

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