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It’s all coming together nicely…

I’m finally going to start having hyperbaric oxygen therapy and I will be combining this with a few other metabolic strategies to attempt to get my brain looking and feeling as healthy as possible. I’m very excited about the potential of this protocol and I will be documting the progress of other patients that I am monitoring doing similar things. I feel this will make for compelling reading. It’s very exciting. I will be taking lots of pictures when I’m there. 

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Special days for seriously ill young adults- Willow

I have written a piece for Willow Foundation which will likely be in the Arsenal match day programme for the Manchester City game on the 21st. My interview about my special day will also be appearing on the big screen before the match but this isn’t about me at all now. If I felt that I would seriously need a personality transplant. I feel incredibly fortunate at this moment despite continued uncertainty. The least I can do is express what a fantastic charity this is for so many. They work tirelessly to provide individuals with life limiting illnesses special days with their loved ones. I have had friends with the same type of cancer as me pass away recently but the small consolation is that their families have special memories with them from special days provided by Willow. The positive impact of these days is immeasurable for these people. Its a wonderful distraction in dark times where you can smile through uncertain times. If you know anyone in this situation or if you can support the charity in any way why not check them out?https://www.willowfoundation.org.uk/about-willow-0

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A long overdue post on Magnesium

I could not stress enough how magnesium supplementation is an ESSENTIAL part of my approach to manage my epilepsy. Control of my horrible, terrifying and debilitating seizures I had suffered in the past has been tremendously liberating and magnesium supplementation has certainly played a crucial role in that success. Magnesium is an abundant mineral in the body serving many biochemical functions and it is an essential electrolyte for all living organisms. It plays an important physiological role particularly in the brain, heart, and skeletal muscles. Normal dietary magnesium intake is estimated to be 300–350 mg per day for adults. Magnesium supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in treatment of, among others, preeclampsia, migraine, depression, coronary artery disease, and asthma. http://physrev.physiology.org/content/95/1/1.abstract In regards to epilepsy specifically it is worth noting this… ‘The concentrations of copper, magnesium, and zinc were all significantly altered in patients with epilepsy who received antiepileptic drugs compared with untreated patients with epilepsy. Designing treatments to selectively restore zinc levels may be a strategy for treating patients with epilepsy. It is still unclear whether these ions are causal to, or a cofactor in, the development of epilepsy. Knowledge of the effects of various antiepileptic drugs on trace element homeostasis could potentially be used to effectively guide appropriate therapeutic strategies in the future.’ http://nutritionreviews.oxfordjournals.org/content/73/11/760.abstract I take magnesium chloride as a critical part of my seizure management approach. I take this orally mixed with water- 10 sprays at least 3-4 times a day. Each dose of 10 sprays = 150mg of Magnesium. I also have other natural treatment components complimenting this supplement nicely. I choose magnesium chloride because for me personally it is the best form I have tried to control my seizure activity (which it does quite remarkably!), and it is convenient. I believe that the benefits of…

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On the campaign trail…

Today was a very insightful first day of campaigning. I learned a great deal through engaging with a variety of students. I have received some useful feedback on my manifesto and will be sharing their views anonymously on the university radio station.  This is obviously a democratic process so I will take in all views and try my best to take appropriate action. It is not a popularity contest for me and I find it a privilege to represent a diverse range of students, some of which have truly remarkable stories.  It is difficult to represent a group of students who fall into the ambiguous category of ‘disabled’, but I will try my best to do the position justice if elected.

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Ketogenic snack to take away

I often do this for simplicity and it doesn’t require any cleaning up. All it requires is:  1 egg 40g ghee A small container (ideally not glass or plastic although in this example that’s what I use) 1 Saucepan Salt and pepper optional of course http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=JQnitJEi8wg&u=/watch%3Fv%3Dab5xjr5WvzQ%26feature%3Dem-upload_owner Here’s a breakdown of the macros: I just like having snacks that I don’t have to think about preparing, it’s simple and easy. 

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Keto kidneys, Satya Project, manifestos, and New Scientist magazine

It’s safe to say it’s been a busy week for me but I’ve thoroughly enjoyed it!  I thought I would take time to update my blog while I prepare what I like to call these ‘keto kidneys’- just look at the huge lumps of fat that surround them!  I’m not a great fan of kidney (they can taste of urine- yuck!! So I will wash them thoroughly and I’m going to cook them in the oven with some herbs for 15 minutes, hoping that they don’t explode. I am eating this for the nutritional benefits and so that my kidneys can remain healthy. I believe that if you eat healthy kidneys you will be provided with the nutrients required to ensure optimal health of your own kidneys. The fat is actually delicious!! These are lamb kidneys.  Grass fed kidney fat- I chopped up the fat to be mixed with the kidneys and meat juice below. All I did was to have this in the oven at 180 for 12 minutes. It’s very ketogenic, nutritious, and there is no need to add extra fat.  I didn’t add mixed herbs in the end and mixed 1 chopped up kidney with the fat and natural meat juice from the cooking process. Still an ‘acquired taste’ but the fatty bits and cooking method make it more palatable. It’s doing me good in terms of my health so I’m happy and I enjoy the fatty bits added with sea salt. This meal cost me £1.85 and will be my only meal of the day.  On Wednesday I had a meeting with Joye Marie Leventhal, founder of Satya Project.  Satya Project is: ‘An international biotechnology company focusing on discovery and development of advanced therapeutics for chronic illnesses and pain.’ http://www.satyaproject.org/ I met Joye at the medical…

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New Scientist magazine and future opportunities

Very enjoyable evening with New Scientist Live hosted by Imperial College London. It gave me great insight into my chosen career path and I made connections with Hal Hodson who is a journalist at New Scientist. We will be meeting up soon to talk about my story and ketogenic diets for cancer management and my future work with my oncologist to devise clinical trials using well planned and structured metabolic approaches.  New Scientist is one of my favourite magazines and it means a lot to me to have the opportunity to talk to them about this metabolic approach to neurological disease. The last thing I want is for people to think of this as an anecdote so when we look at what is happening at the cellular level and when we can see how active I am at university and with the neurological team at Charing Cross Hospital it can only help me to achieve what I hope. I thank Imperial College Lobdon for getting involved in this research and for hosting such useful, interesting events. I will be looking forward to attending more!… I also got a free goodie bag and a geeky New Scientist t-shirt. 😉

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